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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> they know they are short of their mandate on both counts. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive
, and thanks for joining us. too little too late. susie, that's the initial reaction from some business leaders to president obama's latest proposal to give tax breaks for businesses. >> susie: tom, the president will detail the plan tomorrow in cleveland. he's proposing that companies write off 100% of their investments in plants and equipment through next year. >> tom: the administration estimates the plan would cut business taxes by about $200 billion over the next two years. for some businesses, this "expensing" proposal could amount to a half-off sale on new equipment. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: you've probably heard about all those businesses sitting on their money, waiting for things to get better. the president's expensing plan could give executives an incentive to make a big purchase, says small business advocate todd mccracken. >> and what that does is it uses up a lot of extra cash that especially a lot of big companies seem to have right now bur that they're not using, they're not investing. and that has the potential to create jobs. >> reporter: but business groups are luke
street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now we see a number of bank
. this over a 52-week low over demand with the semiconductors. does this worry you? >> it doesn't worry us longer term, and this is absolutely the right time to pick up a name like this. there isn't a lot of net debt on the balance sheet. they have actually been a consolidator, and this is a great time to enter this marketment we think there be much more consolidation. >> tom: mark, when you talk about long-term, is it 12, 18 months, or longer? >> probably a couple of years. >> tom: f.m.c. technology is unique in technology. it is really an oil services technology ferm. it has had a nice rally off the summertime lows. what is the catalyst? >> part of it was the concerns about the cessation of deepwater drilling. we recently added this name because they're one of the more environmentally-friendly players in the industry. they have an excellent safety record. we think longer term, they will continue to be safe drilling. this is one of the ways to play that. >> tom: back on march 17th, you were with us in the springtime. eastman kodak, off by almost 40%. sineron medical, off by 24%. and ameri
, the yen, and bought u.s. dollars. the idea is to drive down the value of the yen versus the dollar, making japan's currency cheaper. >> wolfgang koester is the c.i.a. at a firm that. welcome back to "nightly business report." what companies do you think get hurt by this japanese yen intervention? >> the people that are going to get hurt are the people that are looking to -- that have costs in japan, more than the people that are looking at the revenues. what is really important is for corporations and their investors to understand where the corporations have the exposures on the revenue, as well as the costs. for example, net exposure side. >> tom: so when you're talking about the cost side, these are companies that have some kind of manufacturing or services based in japan that could get hurt by this intervention, right? >> precisely. that's absolutely correct. that's what we're seeing at fireapps. we're seeing companies coming and looking and trying to see how this yen appreciation impacts them, and there is a focus on the second part of this, which is the cost focus. >> tom: i imagine a
our economy into a ditch, or do we keep moving forward with policies that are slowly pulling us out? >> reporter: too slowly, republicans fired back. on jobs, republican leader john boehner argued the president's policies are the problem, and a few new ideas won't change that. >> until this uncertainty and spending is under control... i don't think these are going to have much impact. >> reporter: what does all this politicking mean for your bottom line? first, on those new proposals from the president: $50 billion in infrastructure spending, an expansion and extension of the research and development tax credits, and 100% expensing of new equipment. the last is most likely to become law, and even that analysts consider a long shot. second, whatever the election outcome, there will be less help coming for the economy. goldman sachs washington analyst alec philips says that's one reason his firm is downgrading their economic forecast for 2011. >> there's really three things happening there. one is the fading effect of the 2009 fiscal stimulus bill. number two is our concern that congr
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)